Dante FAQs

The audio packets can be transmitted using either unicast addressing or multicast addressing. By default they are sent using unicast addressing, but the user can change this to multicast using the Dante Controller.

More info

While we try to test as many programs as possible, we cannot test every digital audio workstation application. We recommend that you download a free trial copy of Dante Virtual Soundcard and test it on your system with your software.

 

All Dante devices except Ultimo-based (low channel count) devices can route audio to themselves.

If you have saved an existing network configuration as a preset, you can edit the preset file offline to change the routing configuration.

However, setting up routing for a new network is only really possible using Dante Controller, while it is actually connected to the network.

More info

 

In most cases the answer is “no”. Dante devices are connected via a network switch, which most often means a “star” topology – all devices are connected to a single central point, which minimizes the number of “hops” through which data must pass. This also avoids the scenario in which the failure of one device causes the entire “daisy chain” to break.

No. While possible in principle, the practical limitations of current wireless technology (802.11a/b/g/n) render reliable audio performance, with ultra-low latency unachievable. For this reason, Dante Virtual Soundcard and Dante Via will not recognize wireless connections for audio data.

However, you can use Dante Controller to control and configure the Dante network over a Wi-Fi connection. Dante Controller must be version 3.10 or higher for Wi-Fi support.

To enable this feature:

  1. Open the Configure Dante Interfaces dialog.
  2. Uncheck 'Use shared Dante interface'. 
  3. Select your wireless adapter.

The wireless adaptor must be connected to the Dante network.

Not currently. Dante networks must be on the same LAN. However, optical fiber is supported for long cable runs.

Yes. However, Dante Virtual Soundcard cannot clock itself, and thus requires that at least one other Dante-enabled hardware device, or a third computer running Dante Via, is present on the network for clocking.

 

No. The Secondary port is used for Dante Redundancy only. To connect multiple Dante devices together, always use a switch.

More info

Yes. Larger Yamaha devices may accept up to four MY16 cards for a total of 64 channels of Dante audio.

 

Yes and yes. Yamaha mixer accept any combination of MY16 cards, and by using different Patch configurations you can accept signals from one format and send them out in another.

 

Yes, you can configure static IP addresses for one or both of the Ethernet ports (for supported devices), via the Network Config tab of the Device View for the device.

However, by default, Dante devices obtain IP addresses automatically - so there should be no need to specify static IP addresses, unless it is a specific requirement for your network.

More info

Yes. Simply connect your Dante enabled devices to an Ethernet switch, using Cat5e or Cat 6 Ethernet cable, and then connect your computer to the same switch.

If you have only one Dante-enabled device to connect to your computer, you may eliminate the switch and simply connect the two with a Cat5e or Cat6 Ethernet cable.

No. Dante Virtual Soundcard is licensed to one machine per license and thus is "licensed" to the machine upon which it is registered. .

Yes, you can deactivate Dante Via (using the button in the Activation panel) and reactivate it on another computer.

  • To open the Activation panel in Windows, click the settings icon  and select ‘Activation’.
  • To open the Activation panel in OS X, choose ‘Activation’ from the Dante Via main menu.

Then log into your Audinate.com account, and go to ‘My Products.’ Copy your Dante Via license ID, and paste it into the ‘Recover license’ field. This will deactivate the license, and allow you to activate another computer.

No.

The Dante Virtual Soundcard places significant demands upon the network throughput of a computer. Virtual machines manage network connections via the CPU rather then through hardware, and thus cannot guarantee low latency under many conditions. For this reason, Dante Virtual Soundcard cannot be installed and registered on a virtual machine.

Unfortunately you cannot run multiple instances of Dante Virtual Soundcard on the same computer.

For high channel count applications, Audinate recommends a Dante PCIe hardware soundcard, which natively supports up to 128 channels, with ultra-low latency.

They are currently available from two leading manufacturers.

Yes. Official Apple Gigabit network adaptor cables are supported for connection to a Dante network. Unofficial Gigabit adaptor cables and 100 Mbit adaptor cables are not supported.

You can also daisy-chain your network connection by connecting a Thunderbolt Gigabit network adaptor cable to a Thunderbolt PCIe adaptor module that is connected to the computer.

Most off-the-shelf switches are fine for use with Dante, apart from unmanaged switches with Energy Efficient Ethernet (EEE), which interferes with Dante clocking.

This PDF lists some of the switches that are not compatible with Dante.

For best performance you should use managed Gigabit switches with Quality of Service (QoS) functionality.

No – Dante does not support Wi-Fi, your networked devices must all be physically connected to the Dante network via Ethernet Cat5e or Cat6 cables across a compatible network switch.

Yes. Multiple instances of Dante Virtual Soundcard can be used as both Transmitters and Receivers.

Note:  Dante Virtual Soundcard is authorized for only one computer per license, and so this will require multiple licenses which may be purchased directly from the Audinate website.

Short answer: no.

EEE (Energy Efficient Ethernet) is a technology that reduces switch power consumption during periods of low network traffic. It is also sometimes known as Green Ethernet and IEEE802.3az.

Although power management should be negotiated automatically in switches that support EEE, it is a relatively new technology, and some switches do not perform the negotiation properly. This may cause EEE to be enabled in Dante networks when it is not appropriate, resulting in poor synchronisation performance and occasional dropouts.

Download list of incompatible, unmanaged switches with Energy Efficient Ethernet

Therefore we strongly recommend that:

  1. If you use managed switches, ensure that they allow EEE to be disabled. Make sure that EEE is disabled on all ports used for real-time Dante traffic.
  2. If you use unmanaged switches, do not use Ethernet switches that support the EEE function, because you cannot disable EEE operation in these switches.

Yes, although we recommend using the Lake Controller to configure audio routing in Lab.gruppen or Dolby equipment.

Yes. The Dante Virtual Soundcard executes with high priority on a computer while in use. Other applications may be used as the resources of your particular computer permit.

 

Not at present. For this reason it is recommended that any unneeded instances of Dante Controller be removed from the network to avoid unwanted changes during use.

More info

Yes! Since version 9, ProTools supports standard Core Audio and ASIO interfaces, including Dante Virtual Soundcard.

Note:  earlier versions of ProTools use a proprietary interface that is not compatible with Dante Virtual Soundcard.

More info

Yes, the audio can be sent over the same network as control information, and even unrelated data traffic.

 

This short video (YouTube - 5m 30s) shows how to configure QoS on a wide selection of Linksys Ethernet switches.

See this FAQ for information about DSCP/Diffserv values.

This symptom indicates that the Dante services cannot communicate with the Dante-enabled devices on the network. This may be caused by port blockage due to protection software, or by the failure of a background service.

Windows PCs

  • Make sure that no third-party firewalls or Internet protection products are active on the computer. Dante software will automatically adjust the built-in Windows firewall.
  • If you have multiple network interfaces (NICs) on the computer, disable any that are not being used by Dante.
  • Check the Services application (Start Menu > Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Services) to see that the Dante Control and Monitoring service (ConMon) is running. Restart this service if necessary.

Mac OS X

Symptom: Dante Controller is installed on Mac running OS X, connected to network containing Dante-enabled devices. Devices appear in Routing tab, but no information is available under Clock Status or Device Info.

This is most frequently the result of a failure of the ConMon process that is running in the background.

Solution 1

Restore functionality by restarting the ConMon process.

  1. Open the Activity Monitor and set it to display “All Processes”.
  2. Use the search function to locate the process conmon_cmm.
  3. Quit this process (will require an administrator’s account) and conmon_cmm will automatically restart.
  4. Restart Dante Controller to complete this procedure.

Device details should now appear.

Solution 2

Replace an older version of ConMon with a current version (older versions may be accidentally retained under some conditions):

  • Reinstall the latest version of Dante Controller.

This will ensure that your version of ConMon is up to date.

Most of the time, you do not need to be involved in the Master Clock selection process. Dante guarantees that the Master Clock device will be by default the strongest candidate.

There are certain circumstances in which the automatic Master Clock selection may be inappropriate. For example, a system may have a device that is periodically connected and disconnected, e.g., an input to the network from a stage box or mixing console. This device may not be always present and thus would be a poor choice for a Master Clock. Using the Preferred Master setting in Dante Controller, you may designate as a Master Clock a device (or devices) that is always present for the entire time that the network is required to function.

More info

On Mac OS X, audio-capable software destinations are not visible to Dante Via.

To send audio to a software destination:

  1. Drag and drop the source onto the 2 Channel Application Input in the Destinations list.
  2. Manually configure the destination application (i.e. using the application’s own preferences panel) to use Dante Via as its audio input.

On Windows, applications may not be properly ‘discovered’ if they were already running when the Dante Via service was stopped and restarted.

To ensure that application sources can be successfully connected to destinations, it is recommended that you close all audio-capable applications before you either update Dante Via, or stop and start Dante Via for any other reason, such as switching to Dante Virtual Soundcard. Then restart the applications once Dante Via is running again.

This may be because Dante Via is not properly optimized for your computer. Go to Preferences > Performance, and change the Performance Optimization setting to 'Low'. Note that this will increase Dante Via's latency.

Click the 'Clear Configuration' button in the general preferences. This will reset all routing, permissions and preferences back to the 'fresh install' configuration. Requires administrator privileges for the computer.

In order to reserve processor resources for time-sensitive multimedia applications (including Windows audio applications), Windows implements a network bandwidth control called 'network throttling', which restricts the processing of non-multimedia network traffic when audio applications are running.

Network throttling can interfere with Dante audio traffic when Windows audio applications are running. For this reason, you can let Dante Via manage the network throttling setting on your PC, to prevent it from interfering with your Dante audio.

If network throttling is configured on your PC, Dante Via will detect it when it is run or installed, and ask you if you would like Dante Via to manage network throttling for you. Changing the setting will require a restart of your PC.

For more information, see this Microsoft knowledgebase article.

This usually indicates that Dante Via is not activated. Use the Activation panel to activate Dante Via.

  • To open the Activation panel in Windows, click the gear icon    to open the main menu, and select ‘Activation’.
  • To open the Activation panel in OS X, go to the Dante Via menu > Activation.

When Dante Via is not activated, it displays a message in red text at the botton of the user interface.

If Dante Via is definitely activated but the user interface is still empty, double-check that Dante Via is actually running.  When it is running, there will be a button at the top of the user interface labeled 'Stop'. If it's labeled 'Start', Dante Via is not currently running. You can also check in the general preferences.

If Dante Via appears to be running (i.e. the UI is showing devices and applications) but you can’t hear the audio you’re expecting to hear, check the operating system sound settings to make sure Dante Via is selected as the default sound device for your operating system, for both playback/output and record/input.

Further steps: Windows

  • Check the volume level for the Dante Via device in the Windows mixer settings (it may just be turned right down).
  • Check your services to see if the dantevia.manager service is running, and restart it if necessary (see 'Checking and restarting the Dante Via service in Windows' below).
  • If everything looks correct, and the dantevia.manager service is running, but you’re still not hearing the audio that you think you should be: Stop Dante Via (using the button, or in the general preferences), stop your audio applications, restart Dante Via, and then restart your audio applications.
  • If that doesn't help, in the general preferences menu, click the 'Clear Configuration' button, acknowledge any system dialogues, then close and restart the Dante Via application.
  • If all else fails, restart your computer.

Checking and restarting the Dante Via service in Windows

  1. Open Task Manager (hold Ctrl + shift + Esc).
  2. Click the Services tab.
  3. Look for the Dante Via Manager service (dantevia.manager). If it is stopped, right-click the service and select Start. If it is running, right-click the service and select Restart.

Further steps: OS X

Check to see if the Dante Via service is running:

  1. Open Activity Monitor (Apps > Utilities > Activity Monitor).
  2. Click the CPU tab.
  3. Sort by Process Name.
  4. Look for the DanteViaDaemon process.

If it is not running, to reset the process:

  1. Go back to Dante Via and open the Dante Via main menu.
  2. Hold down the 'Option' key (or the 'Alt' key for non-Mac keyboards).
  3. Select 'Quit and Restart Audio'.
  4. Enter the computer (admin) password in the Terminal window, and press Return.
  5. When the process has completed, close the Terminal window.

This may crash Dante Controller, if it is running - just acknowledge the error message and restart it.

You can rename Dante devices using Dante Controller. You can also rename Dante Via computers using the standard operating system methods. You cannot however rename software applications or local devices in Dante Via.

Yes you can. Depending on the nature and configuration of the device or application, one or more of a variety of things may happen:

  • You will be able to record, hear or process a copy of whatever audio the source is producing
  • Feedback
  • Nothing
  • The collapse of the space-time continuum

Our advice is to experiment and see what happens.

Dante Via will periodically connect to the Internet to validate its license with the licensing server. In order for Dante Via to remain activated, the computers on which it is installed must be continuously or regularly connected to the Internet.

If Dante Via cannot connect to the Internet for a period of more than 30 days, it will automatically deactivate. If you need to run Dante Via offline for more than 30 days at a time, please contact Audinate sales.

Select the ‘Enable Dante’ control for the relevant source.

To hide a source from the network, deselect the ‘Enable Dante’ checkbox.

When a source is Dante-enabled, it will appear in Dante Controller as channels nested under your computer name, and can be routed like any other Dante channels.

If someone on the network has made a source or a source mix available on the network (using the ‘Enable Dante’ control), it will show up under their computer name in the Via Devices section of your Sources list. To listen to it, just drag it to a destination, such as your headset or speakers (or you can send it to any other destination if you want to use it for other purposes).

The owner of the source will be presented with an access control pop-up, asking them to allow or deny the connection.

To mute system sounds from the default mix when it is playing to the default output, hover over the System Sounds icon in the ‘Now Receiving’ area for the default output destination, and click the speaker icon.

You can also completely replace the default mix by sending another source to your default output.

If you accidentally give someone permission to connect to one of your sources, or you decide that you no longer want them to have permission, you can revoke all permissions (for all users) by clicking the ‘Clear Permissions’ button in the Privacy preferences.

Any new connections to any of your sources will require your permission, and any existing connections will require permission to be re-granted (you will be presented with an access control pop-up for each connection, which can be allowed or denied individually).

Just drag the source onto the destination. You can choose to replace any source that is already playing to the destination, or add it to the current source to create a mix.

To send a source to a networked Dante-enabled device (i.e. a remote hardware device that is not connected to a computer – such as a mixing console) you must use Dante Controller.

First expose your source to the Dante network, by selecting ‘Enable Dante’ for the source. Then launch Dante Controller. Your source will appear in Dante Controller as transmit and receive channels, nested under your computer name.

Then subscribe the hardware device to your source’s transmit channels, like you would any other Dante device. See the Dante Controller user guide for information about routing audio.

When you drag a source onto a destination, you will be asked if you want it to replace the existing source, or add the source to a mix.

If you choose to add the source to a mix, it will create a (typically stereo) mix of the existing source and the new source. Source volume levels must be controlled at the source.

'Listeners' are other network users who have routed one of your shared sources to one of their local destinations (and you have granted them permission).

There are 3 ways to remove a listener from one of your sources:

  1. Disable the ‘Enable Dante’ control for the source - this takes it off the Dante network.
  2. Use Dante Controller to unsubscribe the receiver from your source.
  3. Click ‘Clear Permissions’ in the Privacy Preferences (this revokes all previously-granted permissions, for all users, and for all of your sources).

Using the first two methods, the listener will be able to reconnect to the source (assuming it is back on the network) without your permission, unless you revoke their permission using the ‘Clear Permissions’ button in the privacy preferences.

To filter sources and destinations by name, type the name (or the first few letters of the name) into the relevant ‘Search’ field. To clear the filtering, delete the text from the search field.

To show or hide a source or destination group, click the arrow ► for that group.

To hide an individual source or destination, right-click the source or destination and select ‘Hide’.

To reveal hidden sources and destinations, from the general tab of the Preferences menu, select ‘Show hidden audio devices’.

Yes - if a source is connected to a destination already, and you drag the source to an additional destination, Dante Via will create an additional connection, and the source will transmit to both destinations simultaneously.

System sounds (for example, error and email notifications) – along with all other running applications – are automatically sent (as part of the default mix) to the default output device destination, assuming no other sources have been specifically sent to that device. Your default output device is the one with the text ‘Default Device’ under its name in the Destinations panel.

Try removing the source or sources playing to the default output device (hover over the source/s in the ‘Now Receiving’ area for the default output device, and click the red x icon) – that device will then revert back to playing the ‘default mix’, which includes your system sounds.

The default output device is set in the General Preferences.

To mute your system sounds, hover over the system sounds icon in the ‘Now Receiving’ area of the default output device destination, and click the speaker icon. Click the icon again to un-mute system sounds.

The Default Device in your destinations is the local hardware device to which Dante Via will send all newly-discovered application sources (i.e. software applications that can produce audio).

For example, if your Default Output Device is set as your computer speakers, when Dante Via detects a new software source, such as iTunes, it will automatically send iTunes audio to the computer speakers. It will also send your system sounds to that device, assuming no other sources have been specifically sent to that device.

Your ‘default mix’ - a mix created automatically by Dante Via containing all software applications (except for ASIO applications in Windows) - is also sent to the default output device, unless something else has been specifically sent there. When the default mix is playing to the default output device, you can mute individual sources (hover over the source and click the speaker icon).

You can change the default output device in the General Preferences.

In Windows, you can also specify a default input device. The Default Input Device is the local hardware device which Dante Via will assign to all newly-discovered application destinations (i.e. software applications that can receive audio). For example, if your Default Input Device is set as your USB headset microphone, when Dante Via detects a new software destination, such as Skype, it will automatically send audio from the headset microphone to Skype.

In Dante Via, a destination is any hardware device or software application that can receive audio from the computer / network system.

Destinations can be physically in the computer, connected to the computer, or connected to the Dante network.

Hardware destinations include:

  • Loudspeakers
  • Internal (built-in) soundcards
  • External (e.g. USB or Firewire) soundcards
  • Computer monitors with built-in speakers
  • USB headsets
  • Dante audio devices (such as mixing consoles)
  • Any Dante Via-installed computers on the Dante network

Software destinations include:

  • Digital Audio Workstations (Cubase, Protools, GarageBand etc.)
  • Skype
  • Video calling / conferencing apps

Devices and applications that can receive audio from the system and add audio to the system are both destinations and sources, so they appear in both lists.

In Dante Via, a source is any hardware device or software application that can add audio to the computer / network system.

Sources can be physically in the computer, connected to the computer, or connected to the Dante network.

Hardware sources include:

  • Internal (built-in) soundcards
  • External (e.g. USB or Firewire) soundcards
  • Internal and external microphones
  • USB headsets
  • Video cameras with built-in microphones
  • Dante audio devices (such as mixing consoles)
  • Hardware synthesizers, and other electronic instruments
  • Any Dante Via-installed computers on the Dante network
  • ‘System audio’ (the internal audio mix that the computer would usually play to the speakers)

Software sources include:

  • iTunes®, Spotify®
  • Skype®
  • Digital Audio Workstations (Cubase®, Pro Tools®, GarageBand® etc.)
  • Web browsers
  • Any other software applications that produce audio (such as games, Microsoft PowerPoint®, email clients etc.)
  • Software synthesizers

Devices and applications that can add audio to the system and receive audio from the system are both sources and destinations, so they appear in both lists.

Sources can also be a mix of two or more individual sources.

Latency is a tiny time delay (10 milliseconds, in the case of Dante Via) that is added by Dante Via to each audio stream. The slight delay gives Via the time it needs to ‘packetize’ the audio from the source and transmit it across the network to the destination before it is due to be played out.

Typically, the 10ms latency should not impact any audio networks you might set up using Dante Via. However, if low latency is your thing, Dante PCIe cards are available, which can deliver extremely low latency (0.15ms).

In OS X, software destinations, such as recording applications, aren’t ever visible in the Dante Via UI.

To send sources to software destinations in OS X, you must send them to the 2 Channel Application Input, and then configure the application to use Dante Via as the recording / input interface.

In Dante Controller, the 2 Channel Application Input appears as receive and transmit channels for your computer named ‘2ch Virtual Soundcard’.

System Sounds is the audio produced directly by your operating system – such as Windows and OS X startup and shutdown sounds, error notifications, and other standard notifications.

System sounds are automatically sent to your default output destination (usually along with any other software sources that are playing audio, as part the ‘default mix’) unless another source has been specifically sent there instead.

By default, Dante Via connects channels sequentially – that is, channel 1 or the source will go to channel 1 of the destination, channel 2 will go to channel 2, 3 to 3 etc. until the channel limit is reached.

For hardware devices, the channel limit is typically the number of channels on the device with the least number of channels. For software, only 2 channels can be connected (inbound or outbound).

For sources and destinations with just stereo capability, the left channel is channel 1, and the right channel is channel 2.

So, for example, sending a stereo microphone to a DAW will connect the microphone’s left channel to channel 1 of the DAW, and the microphone’s right channel to channel 2 of the DAW.

You can use our Dante Controller application (it’s free!) to more precisely control how individual channels are routed.

Dante Via supports one-to-many connections – i.e. you can send any individual channel from a source to multiple channels on a destination.

Loudspeakers add audio to the physical environment, but not to the computer / network system; they receive audio from the system, which is why they are destinations.

Microphones receive audio from the physical environment, but not from the computer / network system; they add audio to the system, which is why they are sources.

Probably because it has built-in speakers and an internal soundcard – which means you can use it to play any audio you like.

In order for someone else to be able to connect to (receive audio from) one of your sources, you must:

  1. Select ‘Enable Dante’ for your source (this puts the source onto the Dante network).
  2. Proactively allow the connection from the other user.

When another user tries to connect to a source that has been Dante-enabled, you will be presented with an access control pop-up asking if you want to allow the connection. If you click ‘Allow’, the user will receive audio from your source. If you click ‘Don’t Allow’, they will not receive any audio.

Note that the privacy option ‘Network devices require my permission … ’ must be enabled in the Privacy preferences in order for you to receive access control pop-ups. If it is disabled, users will be able to connect to your Dante-enabled sources without your permission. Audinate strongly recommends that you do not disable the ‘Network devices require my permission … ’ option.

A Dante Virtual Soundcard License can only be activated a limited number of times, and this activation limit has been exceeded.

Please be aware that the license for this software is for use on a single machine only (like a physical sound card license). The license agreement you acknowledged when you activated Dante Virtual Soundcard does not allow you to use the same license ID on multiple machines. In order to use Dante Virtual Soundcard on a second machine, you will need to purchase an additional license.

Reinstalling Dante Virtual Soundcard on a machine that it was previously installed on should not require an additional activation, and should be possible without limit.

If you believe this message is in error, please fill out the form at the bottom of this page, select 'Move or Reinstall DVS' and include your license ID.

The License ID that has been entered is not a known Dante Virtual Soundcard License ID.

Check to make sure a valid Dante Virtual Soundcard License ID has been entered, and not a serial number for a different product.

If you are seeing this after entering a DVS Token from the product packaging of Dante enabled equipment:

DVS tokens are bundled with some Dante products. A DVS (Dante Virtual Soundcard) token is a unique code that can be redeemed for a fully-functional Dante Virtual Soundcard license ID, which can then be used to activate Dante Virtual Soundcard. A DVS token can not be entered directly into the license field on the Dante Virtual Soundcard application, it must be redeemed first to produce a license ID.  You can redeem the DVS token for a Dante Virtual Soundcard license ID here: Redeem DVS Token

If you are seeing this after entering the serial number of a Dante-MY16-AUD card:

As of July 2013, the Dante-MY16-AUD product box includes updated documentation. The Dante-MY16-AUD card itself is unchanged. As part of this update, we have changed the way you redeem the Dante Virtual Soundcard License bundled with your Dante-MY16-AUD purchase. 

If your product box contains a 'Download Your Software' card (like the one shown below) with a DVS token label on it, you can redeem the DVS token for a Dante Virtual Soundcard license ID here: Redeem DVS Token

As of this date, we no longer record or track the serial numbers of the Dante-MY16-AUD cards.  If the card above was missing from your product box, or if you have misplaced the card, we do not track which DVS Tokens were included in each Dante-MY16-AUD product box.  Yamaha provides exclusive distribution and support for the Dante-MY16-AUD card. Support information can be accessed by contacting your authorized Yamaha Pro Audio Dealer. 

Meaning:
Dante Virtual Soundcard could not find the IP address of the Audinate Licensing Server. Likely to be caused by local network DNS failure or Proxy settings.

Action:
Wait and try again in case the issue is temporary. If the problem persists please talk to your local IT support staff

 

Dante Software Support on Sierra (macOS version 10.12)

Audinate is in the process of validating Dante software on Sierra.

Dante Controller

The latest version of Dante Controller (v3.10.0.19 for macOS) has passed validation and is fully supported on macOS Sierra.

Dante Virtual Soundcard

The latest version of Dante Virtual Soundcard (v3.10.0.8 for macOS) has passed validation and is fully supported on macOS Sierra.

Dante Via

The latest version of Dante Via (v1.1.1.1 for macOS) has passed validation and is fully supported on macOS Sierra.

Dante PCIe Card Drivers

The current GA Dante PCIe card drivers for Focusrite and Yamaha cards for macOS are not currently supported on Sierra. Updated driver versions will be published individually by the manufacturers as soon as they become available.

The latest Audinate PCIe-R card driver for macOS does however support 10.12 Sierra. Note that you cannot use this driver for Focusrite or Yamaha cards.

No. You may record with a very simple setup consisting of only one MY16-AYD and one computer running Dante Virtual Soundcard, connected via a regular Ethernet CAT5e cable.

If you wish to use any additional devices, such as more MY16-AUD cards, then you must use a switch to connect all devices together.

Yes, you need Dante Controller.

Dante Controller is a free application that may be downloaded from our website (include URL). Dante Controller allows you to see and make connections between Dante-enabled devices on your network. You need it in order to establish connections to and from your Dante Virtual Soundcard. Once the connections and routes are initially set up, Dante Controller does not need to be running.

No. With Dante you may route signals on an individual basis from device to device.

More info

No. It is not necessary to turn Dante Virtual Soundcard off when you power off your computer. The Dante Virtual Soundcard application acts like a control panel, allowing the user to configure and enable the software. Dante Virtual Soundcard will show up as a soundcard in your audio settings. Once the application window is closed, Dante Virtual Soundcard continues to function and be available, even if the computer is restarted.

More info

The fact is there will always be new standards. AES67 is based on mature IETF standards, such as RTP,  that have existed for some time, so in many respects the underlying protocols can be thought of as mature and widely deployed, rather than new.

No. Unlike some other network standards, it does not depend on specialized or modified Ethernet switches in order to operate. AES67 was designed to operate on existing Ethernet infrastructure.

No. Dedicated network infrastructure is not required. Dante-enabled devices can happily co-exist on an existing converged data network. Dante, VoIP, and email traffic can all transmit across your business network together.

 

Yes, but all Ethernet switches support multicast. Dante doesn’t need special multicast features from switches and is designed to work efficiently with advanced multicast features like IGMP Snooping.

More info

No. Unlike other many other audio networking protocols, no special network infrastructure is required. Since Dante is based upon universally accepted networking standards, Dante-enabled devices can be connected using inexpensive off-the-shelf Ethernet switches and cabling.

 

No. however we strongly recommend that Gigabit switches be used due to the clear advantages in performance and scalability. Please refer to our FAQ page regarding switches.

 

Yes. Because Dante works with standards based networking technology, using fiber is simple. Use a switch that supports fiber connections to send Dante data over a fiber optic cable.

Ethernet is not copper or fiber based, it is independent of the cabling medium. Many organizations will have fiber already in place from other projects and this can simply be re-used on a Dante network.

No. Once the system has been set up the Dante Controller can be shut down or removed. The routing information is stored in the Dante-enabled devices themselves.

 

No. While the Dante Virtual Soundcard generally exhibits higher latency than Dante hardware devices, performance is not compromised by the addition of a Dante Virtual Soundcard device to the network. This is because Dante does not require latency to be a single value for the whole network.

More info

No and no. Adding new devices to a network does not affect the latency of devices already in the network. The latency of hardware devices does not depend on the number of audio channels routed, and routing additional audio channels does not change the latency of audio already passing through the network.

More info

No. Routing is independent of this setting, which is made in Dante Controller.

More info

Be sure that you are running the latest versions of Dante Controller and Dante Virtual Soundcard for your operating system.  If this is the case:

  • If there are two different wired network interfaces on your computer, ensure that they are in different subnets – or disable the unused network interface.
  • Check that you have no firewall active – please see the Dante controller user guide for details of how to safely configure a firewall for use in a deployed network.
  • Check that you have no antivirus software active (Dante uses 'unusual' port addresses, due to the 'usual' port addresses already being used by other common applications) – you will need to configure your antivirus software to allow the full function of Dante.

 

It is very accurate. Dante clocking guarantees that all devices are synchronized to within 1 microsecond or less, and that all devices can play out audio at the level of sample accuracy.

 

Audio routing is label-based. In other words routes are defined using device and channel names, not the underlying device addresses or channel IDs. This means that if a Dante device fails and is swapped out for another piece of equipment with identical labels, audio routes will be automatically re-established.

More info

With human-readable, editable labels.

Channels within the device have easy to read, editable labels that are visible in Dante Controller. By default, channels are usually labeled with numbers, but users are free to create labels that reflect channel content using Dante Controller. Again, device and channel label names are retained, even as the devices are power-cycled.

More info

With human-readable, editable labels.

Each Dante-enabled device has a label that identifies it on the network. Names are initially preset by the manufacturer, but may be easily renamed by the user via Dante Controller. Device and channel label names are retained, even as the devices are power-cycled.

More info

In Dante Controller, double-click the device you wish to label. This opens a Device View. Click in the text areas for the Receive and Transmit tabs and you can freely type labels for each channel.

More info

Dante Virtual Soundcard may be purchased directly from this website.

Note:  A single license of Dante Virtual Soundcard is included with Dante-enabled products from several of our partners.

Overview

Dante devices that have been ‘misplaced’ are those that have been configured with a static IP address which falls outside the subnet that the Dante Controller computer is on (or more specifically, the subnet configured on the network interface which is selected in Dante Controller as the primary network interface).

Locating Misplaced Devices

Because Dante devices use MDNS multicast advertising, misplaced devices will always be visible in Dante Controller, if the computer is connected to the same physical network as the misplaced device.

However, the misplaced device and the computer must be either:

  • Both using IP adresses inside the Link-Local address range (169.254.1.0 to 169.254.254.255 inclusive), or
  • Both using IP addresses outside the Link-Local address range

First, assign a static IP address to your computer which is inside the Link-Local address range. If the device does not appear (as described below), assign an address which is outside the Link-Local address range and try again.

They will not appear in the Routing tab of the Network View, but they will appear (highlighted in red) in the Device Info, Clock Status and Network Status tabs of the Network View:

They will also appear (highlighted in red) in the device drop-down list in Device View (Ctrl + D):

Recovering Misplaced Devices

Note: ‘Recovering’ in this context is not the same as failsafe recovery.

To recover a misplaced device:

  1. Ensure the computer running Dante Controller has an IP address outside the Link-Local address range (either set a static address, or use DHCP).
  2. Open the device view for the device (either double-click the device in the Device Info, Clock Status or Network Status tabs, or open Device View and select the device from the drop-down list).
  3. Record the IP address listed in the first line of the Details section (after ‘Resolved device address on Dante interface is’)
  4. Configure your computer’s network interface with a static IP address in the same range as the IP address for the device. It is recommended that you use the same values for the first three octets – in this example, that would be 11.12.13 – and then choose a different number for the last octet (e.g. 15). The operating system will provide a suitable subnet mask (the last octet must be zero, however). In Windows, you can tab to the ‘Subnet mask’ field to auto-populate the field.
  5. Apply the changes to the computer’s IP address, and return to Dante Controller.
    The device should now appear in the Routing tab of the Network View, and can be configured with a different address (or set to ‘Obtain an IP Address Automatically’) using the Network Config tab of the Device View.
  6. Set the computer’s network interface to obtain an IP address automatically (or restore it to its previous address).

The misplaced device will now appear in the main Dante network.

The suggestions below can be used to improve Windows PC performance for audio recording and processing in some (most) situations. However, all systems are different, and there are no guarantees. We recommend that you create a system restore point before making fundamental changes to your PC. The suggestions below assume you are using Windows 7 (Windows feature paths may differ for other operating systems).

Warning:  Audinate accepts no responsibility for negative consequences as a result of following these recommendations.

  1. Defragment the hard drive regularly. This will improve data access times and reduce the load on the hard drive.
  2. Disable any screen savers, antivirus software, Windows Firewall, and Windows Defender. Background tasks that kick in unexpectedly can interrupt audio. Also disable system sounds to prevent them creeping into recordings. (Note: Disabling all firewall and antivirus software is not recommended for computers with active Internet connections.)
  3. If you need a paging file, increase the virtual memory (swap space). A rule of thumb is to set your virtual memory to twice the size of your RAM, but there are other considerations. If you're sure you do not need a paging file, switch it off entirely for all drives. Search for a good resource on swap space / virtual memory / paging file optimization for more information.
  4. Ensure your computer's power profile (Control Panel > Power Options) is set to High Performance (or 'Adjust for best performance'), and disable theme effects, and window animations. This will ensure your CPU speed is not restricted, and processing power is not wasted on moving unnecessary pixels around.
  5. Configure the power profile to prevent sleep / hibernation and hard drive shut-down due to inactivity. Surprise shut-downs cause catastrophic interruptions to recordings.
  6. Make sure DMA (Direct Memory Access) is enabled on each IDE channel. DMA is the recommended (fastest) disk access method for audio. To enable DMA, open the device manager (right-click My Computer and select Manage > Device Manager). Then expand the IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers, open the properties (right-click) for each channel, and ensure DMA is enabled in the Advanced settings.
  7. Remove all unnecessary fonts. Loading fonts uses resources.
  8. Ensure all hard drives related to audio work are formatted as NTFS.
  9. Ensure your BIOS and chipset drivers are up to date. Go to your chipset manufacturer's website for more information.
  10. Set processor scheduling to 'Background Services' (Control Panel > System > Advanced System Settings > Advanced > Performance). This should improve audio driver performance.
  11. Switch off automatic indexing (go to Start and type in 'indexing options' > press Enter > Modify). Indexing requires processor power, which you require for audio.
  12. Disable Wi-Fi. Computers that are trying to connect to unstable Wi-Fi networks are prone to CPU spikes, which can interrupt audio.
  13. Ensure your OS and all drivers are updated to the latest versions.
  14. If you know what you're doing, use services.msc to set any unnecessary startup services to 'manual'. If you aren't sure about which services to change, skip this step, or check out Black Viper's service configurations pages.
  15. DPC Latency Checker is a free application that can be used to analyse your computer's processing performance. Any significant number of DPC spikes above 100µsec have the potential to interrupt audio when running with low buffer settings. As a rule of thumb, a PC can be considered to be well-configured when the average DPC latency is below 100µsec. There should be minimal spikes beyond that level. Unfortunately, other hardware device drivers are normally responsible for these spikes. The process for identifying and removing the offending drivers is simply trial and error. As always, make sure you start off with the most up-to-date device drivers for all of your hardware.
  16. 'Flow Control' and 'Interrupt Moderation' can reduce the performance of your Ethernet interface and cause packets to be delayed. This is often the cause of late audio measurements on the Latency graph in Dante Controller for connections in and out of DVS. To configure Flow Control and Interrupt Moderation:
    1. Go to Control Panel > Network and Internet > Network Connections
    2. Right-click the network adaptor you use for Dante traffic, and select ‘Properties’
    3. Click ‘Configure’
    4. Select the ‘Advanced’ tab
    5. Click ‘Flow Control’ and set the value to ‘Disabled’
    6. Click ‘Interrupt Moderation’ and adjust for best performance (reduced latency vs. CPU usage)
    7. Click OK

Advanced Configuration

Many motherboards provide additional configuration options. To achieve reliable performance at very low buffer settings, the following may also be required:

  • Set CStates to OFF
  • Disable Intel SpeedStep
  • Enable TurboBoost

Surprisingly, hardware RAID can be problematic for low-latency performance. This might sound counter-intuitive, but the device drivers required to run hardware RAID controllers (in particular, Intel RAID controllers that may be built into your motherboard) can result in excessive DPC spikes in the system. This prevents the audio hardware and DAW from timely access to memory, which will limit your ability to reduce ASIO buffers to the minimum possible value. Your system running a driver called IASTOR.SYS is indicative of hardware RAID being enabled.

Many motherboards provide an option to disable this, however, it will require the hard disk to be re-formatted and the OS re-installed. If you really know what you are doing, it is certainly possible to install a second disk and selectively boot between the two as you toggle RAID on or off. Remember that a disk formatted for a hardware Raid system will not be readable if raid is disabled, and vice versa.

Very Advanced Configuration

Microsoft provide a Windows Performance Toolkit as part of the development SDK. This includes a tool called “xperf”. This is a very advanced tool that can help you to identify which drivers are responsible for any DPC or Interrupt latency in your system. If you have access to this tool, you can use it to identify components in your system that may be causing DPC or other forms of system latency. Search http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-US/ for xperf for more information.

Dante automatically discovers devices when they are connected to the Dante network, so you just need to plug your new device into your computer, or connect it to the network switch (or in some cases, you can daisy-chain it to another device). It will appear in Dante Via within seconds.

In Windows, Dante Via automatically discovers audio-capable sources and destinations when they are actively playing or recording, respectively.

Note: Some audio applications will need to be configured to use Dante Via as their input and/or output device before they will appear in Dante Via.

In OS X, software sources are discovered as soon as they are running. Software destinations are not displayed, and sources must be sent to software applications via the 2 Channel Application Input.

Configuration of the MY16-AUD is much like that of other MY16 cards in Yamaha equipment. You must:

  1. Install the card in an available slot (see instructions included with the MY16-AUD).
  2. Configure the Word Clock options on the Yamaha equipment.
  3. Configure the input and output Patches on the Yamaha equipment to use the Dante MY16-AUD.

Configuring the Word Clock

In a Dante network, the Master Clock device will provide an accurate word clock to the rest of the network. Master Clocks are elected automatically or may be designated by the user in Dante Controller.

Clock Choices

With the MY16-AUD, you have two choices of clock source; the MY16-AUD itself or the internal clock of the Yamaha product in which it is installed.

If the MY16-AUD clock is used, then any clock failure on the Dante network will be automatically corrected. If the Master loses connection or fails, another device will automatically be elected instantly with no loss of audio. For purely Dante-based environments, this is a preferred method.

If you are using multiple (non-Dante) devices that require a common clock, then you may wish to use the internal clock of the Yamaha product (which may itself be receiving clock from an external source). While Yamaha products offer many clock frequencies, the Dante MY16-AUD requires either 48kHz or 96kHz. Note that a failure of this internal clock will require a re-syncing operation that may take up to 20 seconds.

To choose either of these options, you must enter the Word Clock Setup page of your Yamaha product and choose either to sync from the MY16 slot or from the internal clock. Once this has been selected, you must make certain that corresponding clock settings on the MY16-AUD are configured using the Dante Controller software (see below for details).

Configuring Patches

For recording, switch the Direct Output function ON for each channel to be recorded, and select the Direct Out point. Pre HPF or Pre ATT is the most likely choice, though Post Fader is also possible with PM5D and M7CL-V2 and V3.

Patch the Direct Out for each channel to the required Slot Output. It will be most convenient to use Slot 1 for channels 1-16, Slot 2 for channels 17-32 and so on.

To save setup time, an example file for PM5D and M7CL containing all the Direct Out and Patch settings can be downloaded from:

http://www.yamahaproaudio.com/training/self_training/index.html

  • Make certain that your network is using good quality components and is running Gigabit throughout
  • Use the highest latency value that you can for your situation
  • Direct recording data to a non-system hard drive if possible
  • Disable all non-essential options for your Network Interface from device Properties in Windows Device Manager (Windows only)
  • Fully disable any unused network interfaces
  • Quit any unnecessary applications or services you may have running

If you haven’t done so already, download Dante Via.

Installing Dante Via

Mac OS X: Open the Dante Via DMG file downloaded from Audinate. Double click the file Dante Via.pkg contained in the DMG and follow the on screen instructions.

Windows: Double click the Dante Via EXE file downloaded from Audinate and follow the on-screen instructions.

Activating Dante Via

  1. Run Dante Via (using the relevant method for your operating system).
    If this is the first time it has been run, an Activation Panel will appear, with buttons for Purchase, Activate or Start Trial. If no activation window appears when you run Dante Via, choose “Activation…” from the Dante Via main menu.
  2. Click Activate.
  3. In the window that appears, enter your Audinate account information.
  4. Click Activate.

That’s it! Your copy of Dante Via is ready to use.

To monitor specific channels on a multi-channel Dante device, first Dante-enable your headphones or speakers (click the ‘Enable Dante control for the headphones or speakers destination), and then use Dante Controller to send the required transmit channels from the Dante device to your headphones’ receive channels.

Dante Controller is free of charge and is available for download to registered users from the Audinate website.

Yamaha provides exclusive distribution and support for the Dante-MY16-AUD card.

Support information can be accessed by contacting your authorized Yamaha Pro Audio Dealer.

Audio routes are most frequently configured using the Dante Controller software, running on any Windows or Mac OSX computer that is attached to the Dante network.

To route signals, Dante Controller presents a grid-style view of devices. Transmitting channels are shown on the upper horizontal axis, while receiving channels are shown on the left hand vertical axis. Clicking at the intersection of a desired transmitter/receiver pair creates a connection instantly, and is indicated by a green checkmark.

Audio may also be routed via licensed third-party configuration software available from suppliers of some Dante-enabled equipment. An example of such a third-party application is the Lake Controller from Lab.gruppen, which can be used to configure Lab.gruppen PLM Amplifiers as well as Dolby Lake Processors.

More info

You can start and stop Dante Via using the button on the main window of the user interface, and in the general preferences.

  • To open the preferences in Windows, click the settings icon  and select ‘Preferences’.
  • To open the preferences in OS X, choose ‘Preferences’ from the Dante Via main menu.

Note that you will need to stop Dante Via if you want to use Dante Virtual Soundcard on the same computer (and vice-versa) – they cannot be used simultaneously. 

In the case of transferring a license from one machine to another, you can use the same license ID that you used for the old machine. You should uninstall the software from the first machine when possible. Please note that a Dante Virtual Soundcard License can only be activated a limited number of times.

Please be aware that the license for this software is for use on a single machine only (like a physical sound card license). The license agreement you acknowledged when you activated Dante Virtual Soundcard does not allow you to use the same license ID on multiple machines. In order to use Dante Virtual Soundcard on a second machine, you will need to purchase an additional license.

At this time, there is no way to deactivate a computer license. To deal with major system upgrades, or to allow for changing computers, simply uninstall the original instance of Dante Virtual Soundcard before installing the second instance. To accommodate the need to transfer the license, we allow multiple activations. However, this sometimes requires manual intervention when we reach the limit.

To use Dante Redundancy, connect a separate set of cables and switches to the Secondary port of the MY16-AUD. This separate network is then connected to the Secondary ports of other Dante devices, creating a complete “backup” network that will be used instantly if there is a failure of the Primary network. Dante Redundancy is glitch-free, producing no audible effects when invoked.

More info

Dante is used to transport digital signals from one place to another on a network. Dante does this very quickly; the typical contribution to the latency of a system by Dante network transport is approximately 150μs, although values as low as 83.3μs can be used. These values are low when compared with the latency requirements of other devices in the signal path, for example Digital Audio Workstation software.

More info

Dante devices each contain a very high quality VCXO clock, and are synchronized with one another over the network using the IEEE 1588 Precision Time Protocol (PTP). One device is elected as the Master Clock to which other devices are synchronized. By default this selection takes place automatically, with no need to manually assign a Master Clock.

More info

Dante uses standard Voice over IP (VoIP) Quality of Service (QoS) switch features to prioritize clock sync and audio traffic over other network traffic. QoS is available in many inexpensive and enterprise Ethernet switches. Any switch that supports Diffserv (DSCP) QoS with strict priority and 4 queues, and has Gigabit ports for inter-switch connections should be appropriate for use with Dante.

See this FAQ for information about DSCP/Diffserv values.

Switches prioritize packets using what are called DSCP/Diffserv values. Although Dante packet priority values have been chosen to make it simple to configure QoS with many switches (as shown in the video above), some switches require special configuration to recognize and prioritize specific DSCP values.

The table below shows how Dante uses various Diffserv Code Points (DSCP) packet priority values:

Priority Usage DSCP Label Hex Decimal Binary
High Time critical PTP events CS7 0x38 56 111000
Medium Audio, PTP EF 0x2E 46 101110
Low (reserved) CS1 0x08 8 001000
None Other traffic BestEffort 0x00 0 000000

 

As a rule of thumb, total bandwidth utilisation (including multicast and unicast) on any given link should not exceed 70% of the supported bandwidth for any link. 

Utilisation above 70% of supported bandwidth can adversely impact clock synchronization (especially if there is also non-Dante traffic on the network).

Dante devices discover one another on the network automatically. Each Dante device discovers the input and output audio channels, sample rates and bit depths of others on the network. Dante devices assign themselves IP addresses that are guaranteed to be unique and not conflict with other devices on the network. When connected to a managed IT network, Dante devices obtain IP addresses and network configuration from the DHCP server in the same way that office PCs and printers do.

More info

Audio is transmitted over the network in IP Packets (UDP/IP.) A single IP packet may contain audio samples from several audio channels, and may contain multiple audio samples for each channel.

 

Dante latency is deterministic; that is, it is not dependent upon circumstances but instead well known and consistent within the system all of the time.

Each Dante receiver introduces a specific, user-adjustable amount of latency before playing out audio to account for any delay variation in the network or end device, and this guarantees that all devices play out in perfect sync. Dante Controller sets this latency per device, and the value selected should be based on the size of the network. Some examples are shown below:

1 switch hop (very small network): 0.15ms
3 switch hops (small network): 0.25ms
5 switch hops (medium network): 0.5ms
10 switch hops (large network): 1ms
+10 switch hops (very large network): 5ms

Dante uses a distributed Master Clock election protocol that automatically selects the best clock for the network, based upon information advertised by each Dante device. This information includes the quality of its clock, clock source, link speed and other parameters, and results in the best clock being elected as the Master Clock.

More info

There are two choices. The source of the Master Clock can be

The internal VCXO clock generated within a piece of Dante enabled equipment, or

An external clock source (e.g. AES3 or word clock in a console) that is internally connected to the Dante device.

More info

Dante Via supports 2x2 channels (2 in and 2 out) for software applications, 32x32 channels for hardware devices, and a total of 48 source channels and 48 destination channels.

This means that you could theoretically run 24 stereo sources into 24 stereo destinations simultaneously, on a sufficiently-powerful computer. However, audio mixes (including the ‘default mix’) require their own additional channels, which deduct from the total supported source channel count.

On OS X, the 2 Channel Application Input occupies 2 source channels.

Individual computer performance and tuning can affect the number of channels that are practically supported.

Using the “Channels” settings on Dante Virtual Soundcard, it can provide the following channel representations:

  • 2x2
  • 4x4
  • 8x8
  • 16x16
  • 32x32
  • 64x64

More info

Latency should always be set as low as is possible. In a live sound system, transport latency less than 1ms is expected, because many other parts of the signal path (signal processors) also add to the overall system latency. In order to bring latency down to the lowest possible values, gigabit connections should be used throughout. This allows greater freedom to build a high performance, flexible network that maintains fantastic low latency performance.

Dante offers sub-millisecond latency for all products.

Upon connection to the network, Dante devices discover one another within just a few seconds. You can watch the devices appear in Dante Controller as they come online.

More info

The standard firewalls that are installed with Windows and OS X are automatically configured by Dante software at installation.

However, if you are using a third-party firewall and/or need to manually enable ports and applications:

Dante Discovery

The Dante Discovery service (the service that automatically discovers Dante devices on the network) requires that the ‘Dante mDNSResponder’ application is allowed access through the firewall (this is a per-application rule, rather than a per-port rule).

Dante Control & Monitoring

Dante Control and Monitoring (ConMon) messages require that the following ports are open: 8700, 8702, 8703, 8705, 8800.

Dante Controller

Dante Controller uses port 8751, and also relies on Dante Discovery and ConMon.

Dante Virtual Soundcard

DVS uses ports 319, 320, 4321, 4440, 4444, 4455 and the range 14336 - 14600.

DVS also relies on Dante Discovery and ConMon.

Dante Firmware Update Manager

Firmware Update Manager uses ports 67, 69, and 6700, and relies on Dante Discovery and ConMon.

Dante Via delivers excellent synchronization across the network. However, auxiliary signal paths (such as USB connections to external soundcards) will add delay.

  • This is likely to be caused by the input not being synchronous to Dante.  Either:
  1. Set the input source to clock to Dante (in most consoles this is a card slot option).
  2. Set Dante to slave to external word clock on this device (external being external to the Dante Network – it is not normally a visible cable).
  • EEE (Energy Efficient Ethernet) is a technology that reduces switch power consumption during periods of low network traffic. It is also sometimes known as Green Ethernet and IEEE802.3az.

    Although power management should be negotiated automatically in switches that support EEE, it is a relatively new technology, and some switches do not perform the negotiation properly. This may cause EEE to be enabled in Dante networks when it is not appropriate, resulting in poor synchronisation performance and occasional dropouts.

  1. If you use managed switches, ensure that they allow EEE to be disabled. Make sure that EEE is disabled on all ports used for real-time Dante traffic.
  2. If you use unmanaged switches, do not use Ethernet switches that support the EEE function, because you cannot disable EEE operation in these switches.
  • Most of the time, you do not need to be involved in the Master Clock selection process. Dante guarantees that the Master Clock device will be by default the strongest candidate.
  • A Dante device with "Slave to External Word Clock" set will use the external word clock from its host equipment to tune its onboard VCXO. A Dante device with this attribute set will become the PTP Master Clock, unless there is another Dante device present with "Preferred Master" set.
  • Sometimes it may be necessary to force a particular device to provide the PTP Master Clock. A Dante device with "Preferred Master" set will always be chosen as the PTP Master Clock. If more than one device has "Preferred Master" set, the device with the lowest MAC address will be chosen.

 

Check the sample rate: Dante devices must be set to 48 kHz in order for them to appear in the Dante Via UI.

There are a range of network conditions that can interfere with a device’s clock stability. These include:

  • A switch on the network is configured to use Energy Efficient Ethernet ('Green Ethernet') functionality
  • A 100 Mb switch or link is present where a Gigabit connection is required
  • One or more switches are incorrectly configured
  • A 'problematic' external word clock is being used as the master clock

Clock instability is often a result of overloaded network links. As a rule of thumb, total bandwidth utilisation (including multicast and unicast) on any given link should not exceed 70% of the supported bandwidth for that link. Utilisation above 70% of supported bandwidth can adversely impact clock synchronization (especially if there is also non-Dante traffic on the network).

Dante Virtual Soundcard exhibits higher latency than Dante-enabled hardware devices, which may result in timing issues with synchronized multicast flows that are being received by both hardware and software devices.

To avoid this problem, use unicast for channels that are being received by both Dante-enabled hardware and Dante Virtual Soundcard simultaneously.

More info

Make sure you are logged into this website, then go to 'My Account' (the link is at the top right) and then click 'My Products'.

Scroll down to 'My Dante Via Licenses', and follow the instructions for recovering a license.

As of July 2013, the Dante-MY16-AUD product box includes updated documentation. The Dante-MY16-AUD card itself is unchanged. As part of this update, we have changed the way you redeem the Dante Virtual Soundcard License bundled with your Dante-MY16-AUD purchase. 

If your product box contains a 'Download Your Software' card (like the one shown below) with a DVS token label on it, you can redeem the DVS token for a Dante Virtual Soundcard license ID here: Redeem DVS Token

As of this date, we no longer record or track the serial numbers of the Dante-MY16-AUD cards.  If the card above was missing from your product box, or if you have misplaced the card, we do not track which DVS Tokens were included in each Dante-MY16-AUD product box.  Yamaha provides exclusive distribution and support for the Dante-MY16-AUD card. Support information can be accessed by contacting your authorized Yamaha Pro Audio Dealer. 

If your product box contains a DVD like the one shown below (and no 'Download Your Software' card), you will need to contact support (see below).

To proceed, you will need to know your Dante-MY16-AUD card serial number.  You can find your Dante-MY16-AUD serial number:

  • On a label on your Dante-MY16-AUD card
  • On a label on your Dante-MY16-AUD original packaging

You can submit your serial number using the form at the bottom of the Dante Software Support page (be sure to select 'Licensing & Registration' as the Case Reason).

You may also see "Fatal error code 0x80070643 - Fatal error during installation".

This can be because you are missing a Windows 7 security update which is required for software applications that use the latest Windows certificate signing method.

If you don't have the required update in your Windows 7 (SP1) installation, you can download and install it to resolve the setup failure issue.

To see if you have the update installed:

  1. Go to Control Panel -> System and Security -> View installed updates.
  2. Use the search field at top right to search for: KB3033929

If the security update appears in the search results, it is already installed, and your problem is probably unrelated.

If it does not appear in the search results, you can download it from: https://www.microsoft.com/en-au/download/details.aspx?id=46148

Install the update and restart your computer, then retry the installation.

 

You will need to manually restart the trial:

1. In Dante Via, open the Activation panel.
2. Click ‘Activate’, and then ‘Enter a License ID’.
3. If the License ID field is pre-populated with your existing license ID, just click ‘Activate’ again. 

If the License ID field is not pre-populated: 

1. Make sure you are logged in to this website.
2. Go to ‘My Account’ (the link is at the top right), and then ‘My Products’.
3. Copy your Dante Via trial license ID from the ‘My Dante Via Licenses’ section.
4. Go back to the Dante Via application, and paste the license ID into the License ID field in the Activation panel, and click ‘Activate’.

Dante redundancy requires that both the primary and secondary interfaces on any redundant device are connected using the same link speed.

For example, if the primary interface is connected to a 1 Gbps switch port, the secondary interface must also be connected to a 1 Gbps switch port. Similarly, if the primary interface is connected to a 100 Mbps switch port, the secondary interface must also be connected to a 100 Mbps switch port.

If the primary and secondary interfaces for any device are connected to ports of different speeds, redundancy will not function properly for that device.

Dante Via is designed for stereo applications. If you have a requirement to move higher numbers of audio channels between audio software and a Dante network, Audinate also provides Dante Virtual Soundcard, which supports up to 64 x 64 channels of audio. Please note Dante Virtual Soundcard acts as an audio interface only, and does not provide the routing functionality of Dante Via.

For even higher channel counts, a Dante PCIe card supports up to 128 x 128 channels, with ultra-low latency. Dante PCIe cards are currently available from two major manufacturers.

This could be because multiple applications with differing sample rates are sharing Dante Virtual Soundcard as their audio interface.

In Windows, if applications with differing sample rates share an audio interface, their sample rates are automatically brought into line by Windows, so it can mix the audio streams. This will result in sample rate conversion on one of the audio streams, which can adversely affect audio quality.

To prevent Windows performing sample rate conversion on Dante Virtual Soundcard audio, the shared mode default format for all Dante Virtual Soundcard channels should be set to match the sample rate currently selected on the Dante Virtual Soundcard control panel.

See the Dante Virtual Soundcard User Guide for more information.

This is because the devices have been configured with different sample rate pull-up/down settings, which means they are operating on different clock domains. Devices on different clock domains cannot be subscribed to each other.

More info

With the Dante-MY16-AUD, you have two choices of clock source; the Dante-MY16-AUD itself, or the internal clock of the Yamaha product in which it is installed (the 'host device'). By default, the host device will use its internal clock.

Either choice will work perfectly well, but you must tell Dante Controller what selection you have made on the host device.

  • If you wqant to use the internal clock in the host device, then in Dante Controller, under Clock Status, you must check the box labelled "Enable Sync to External" for the Dante-MY16-AUD card.
  • If you are using the clock in the Dante MY16-AUD, in Dante Controller, under Clock Status, you must NOT check the box labelled "Enable Sync to External".

If these settings are incorrect, then the symptom is a system that appears to be working, but produces no audio.

More info

It doesn’t.  Dante devices will always remain interoperable with other Dante devices.  This means that your Dante network will still work with Dante-enabled products from over 135 licensed audio equipment manufacturers, as well as your personal computer running Dante Virtual Soundcard.

Yes. Note that if more than one device is selected as the "Preferred Master", the device with the lowest MAC address will be chosen during a clock election.

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  • Check that the Dante Virtual Soundcard is turned on.
  • Check that the network interfaces being used by Dante Virtual Soundcard are the correct ones.
  • Check the IP address settings of Dante Virtual Soundcard.

 

  • Check that the network cable is plugged in securely and that the activity lights are flashing rapidly.
  • Check that the correct network interfaces are selected.
  • Check that your network interfaces have the correct IP addresses (set to acquire IP address automatically).
  • If there are two different wired network interfaces on your computer, ensure that they are in different subnets – or disable the unused network interface.
  • Check that you have no firewall active – please see the Dante controller user guide for details of how to safely configure a firewall for use in a deployed network.
  • Check that you have no antivirus software active (Dante uses 'unusual' port addresses, due to the 'usual' port addresses already being used by other common applications) – you will need to configure your antivirus software to allow the full function of Dante.
  • Check that the network cable is plugged in, and that the activity lights are flashing (fairly rapidly).
  • Check that the correct network interfaces are selected. The selected network interfaces can be changed via the 'interface selection' button in the main Dante Controller toolbar.
  • Check that your network interfaces have the correct IP addresses (set to acquire IP address automatically).
  • If there are two different wired network interfaces on your computer, ensure that they are in different subnets – or disable the unused network interface.
  • Check that you have no Antivirus software installed (Dante uses 'unusual' port addresses, due to the 'usual' port addresses already being used by other common applications).
  • Check that you have no firewall active – please see the Dante controller user guide for details of how to safely configure a firewall for use in a deployed network.

Due to a temporary Windows security certificate issue, Internet Explorer may report that the signature of a downloaded Dante Via installer file is corrupt or invalid.

The downloaded file is not actually corrupt, and can be safely installed from your Downloads folder.

The signature validity issue will be resolved in an upcoming release.

No. AES67 is an interoperability specification that could potentially provide an RTP-based transport in an AVB Layer 3 solution. The AVnu Alliance is responsible for defining the future specifications of the AVB Layer 2 and ultimately IP / Layer 3 transports.

Audinate does not see networking protocols as competing technologies. Neither AES67 nor AVB are competitive equivalents to Dante. AES67 and AVB are both a collection of standards, which are not actual implementations. Dante is a commercially supported solution, and more than just a standard. It is important to emphasize that AES67 will be incorporated as an option within Dante, rather than an alternative to it. Our OEMs recognize the benefit we provide to enable them to develop their products quickly and benefit from our expertise. 

Video: The Role of AES67 in Audio Networking and a Dante Environment

Currently only in a subset of universes, of which (unfortunately) this is not one.

No - Dante Via uses device names for audio routing, which means that a nameless computer will prevent Dante Via from functioning correctly.

Dante Controller incorporates support for device identification. Double click any device in the Network View to open the Device View, the click on the “Identify” button. This will cause LEDs on the device to flash (note that not all Dante devices support this feature).

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Yes. The Dante Controller can be used to set a Dante device to be "Preferred Master".

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Yes. Once routes are established with Dante Controller, a simple network of two Dante devices will work in a stand-alone fashion.

 

Yes, the latest versions of Dante Controller and Dante Virtual Soundcard operate on Macs running OS X 10.10 Yosemite.

Dante Controller requires Java on OS X. Java is installed automatically with OS X 10.7 and 10.8, but not with OS X 10.9 or 10.10.
If Java is not present when Dante Controller is first started, your machine should automatically install Java. If for some reason this does not occur automatically, please visit www.audinate.com/dc-macosx-java.

Go to the Dante Controller page for a link to the latest version.

Yes, the latest versions of Dante Virtual Soundcard and Dante Controller operate on Macs running OS X 10.10 Yosemite. 

Go to the Dante Virtual Soundcard page for a link to the latest version.

Audinate has completed the process of validating Dante software on OS X 10.11. The following Dante software applications are compatible with OS X 10.11:

  • Dante Controller v3.6.2.4
  • Dante Virtual Soundcard v3.7.4.3
  • Dante Firmware Update Manager v1.4.16.6
  • The latest Dante PCIe card drivers for OS X

Multicast and unicast can be used simultaneously on a Dante device. Channels are individually selectable for multicast transmission.

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Yes.

Latency can be configured to be different between different devices in the same network, and does not have to be the same for all connections on the network. Dante allows you to configure low latency connections for critical audio paths, while at the same time running higher latency connections for a broadcast or recording feed where latency is less critical.

It is important to note that in order to achieve consistent system latency, the latency imposed by different processors on the network should also be taken into account. Dante has no control over the latency of devices such as consoles or speaker processors, and these devices require a certain amount of latency to fulfill their respective functions.

Yes, Dante Controller has been fully validated on Windows 10.

Yes, Dante Virtual Soundcard has been fully validated on Windows 10.

Layer 3 refers to the logical layer of networking technology which is concerned with addressing, routing and prioritizing data. Because Dante uses the Internet Protocol to manage the way audio is moved around the network, it is referred to as a layer 3 solution.

This is because the device has been configured with sample rate pull-up/down, and so is operating on a dedicated clock domain. To check if a device has been configured with sample rate pull-up/down, open the Device View for the device, and select the Device Config tab. The sample rate pull-up/down setting is shown in the Sample Rate section.

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If you see this message, it may be because your local hosts file (located at /etc/hosts) is corrupt. 

If you have edited your local hosts file, please check it for syntax errors.

See this URL for instructions on how to reset your local hosts file.

This may be because your local hosts file (located at /etc/hosts) is corrupt. 

If you have edited your local hosts file, please check it for syntax errors.

See this URL for instructions on how to reset your local hosts file.

Dante is a complete media networking solution designed for high quality AV streaming. The A/V industry has embraced Dante because it is easy to set up, delivers a rich and robust feature set and is the most interoperable networking solution available. From the beginning, Audinate has incorporated standards to create the Dante product suite, and AES67 provides another standards-based transport choice within Dante for Layer-3 / IP-based audio networks.

In order to conserve bandwidth, Dante does not constantly query devices on the network. As a result, some changes may require several seconds to appear in Dante Controller even when the Refresh button is clicked.

 

This is because you have Active Clock Status Monitoring switched on, and Dante Controller has identified that the device is showing signs of significant instability. This means that the device is at risk of losing sync with the master clock, at which point it will be automatically muted.

To toggle Clock Health Monitoring on and off, click the Clock Status Monitoring button on the main toolbar: 

Usually this is the result of a network configuration or hardware issue that is causing inconsistent packet timing. For example:

  • Energy Efficient Ethernet ('Green Ethernet') functionality is active on a switch.
    EEE is a power-management system for Ethernet switches, and can easily interfere with clock synchronisation. Audinate recommends that you avoid unmanaged switches with EEE functionality, and fully disable EEE on any managed switches.
     
  • There is a 100 Mb switch or link where a Gigabit connection is required.
    If your devices require Gigabit connections, make sure there are no 100 Mb links or switches in the chain. Audinate recommends always using Gigabit switches for network backbones.
     
  • One or more of your switches are incorrectly configured, or are not suitable for Dante networking.
    Ensure that you are using switches that support QoS, and Dante traffic is properly prioritised.
     
  • Network stress from other sources.
    If you are running traffic from other sources across the network, it may be causing bandwidth issues that are interfering with Dante packet timing.
     
  • Excessive multicast traffic.
    Using multicast flows where they are not actually necessary can overload a network, particularly if there are any 100 Mb switches or links present. Consider switching some subscriptions to unicast to take the pressure off the slower nodes in your network. The Dante multicast audio bandwidth for the network is displayed in the Dante Controller menu bar.

As a rule of thumb, total bandwidth utilisation (including multicast and unicast) on any given link should not exceed 70% of the supported bandwidth for that link. Utilisation above 70% of supported bandwidth can adversely impact clock synchronization (especially if there is also non-Dante traffic on the network).

It is also recommended (for this particular issue, and in general) that you ensure all your Dante devices are using the latest firmware, and that you are using the latest version of Dante Controller.

The license for Dante Virtual Soundcard is for one computer only. If you wish to use Dante Virtual Soundcard on multiple computers, you must purchase additional licenses.

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Yes.

Dante supports 16, 24 or 32-bit audio, and multiple bit depths across a device (for example, 4 channels at 16-bit, 4 channels at 24-bit, etc.). In cases where two devices are working with differing bit depths, Dante will select and use the highest bit depth that is supported by both devices (or more specifically, supported by both channels).

All Ethernet switches are capable of working with Dante. However, please be aware that there are some features on some kinds of switches that will allow you to build larger and more reliable Dante networks.

This icon indicates that your computer does not have an active wired network (Ethernet) connection, which is required by Dante Via (Wi-Fi is not supported). Make sure your computer is physically connected to an Ethernet network.

If you think you are physically connected to a network, you may have a broken or faulty cable, or a faulty network switch, or the network connection may be disabled in your computer's network settings.

  This icon indicates that you have two or more active wired network connections to your Dante network.

You should only ever have one active wired connection to your Dante network.

If you see it when you have a wired and a wi-fi connection to the same network, it can be ignored.

When using Dante Virtual Soundcard observe the following guidelines:

  • Make certain that Dante Virtual Soundcard is turned ON before starting your audio application (e.g. Nuendo, Logic, etc). Remember, Dante Virtual Soundcard is virtual hardware and the audio application needs to know that it is there as it starts
  • Close your projects and your audio applications before stopping Dante Virtual Soundcard
  • Dante Virtual Soundcard settings cannot be changed while Dante Virtual Soundcard is running. Be sure to close your audio applications and disable Dante Virtual Soundcard before making changes
  • Configure your computer to provide good performance for audio applications as per recommendations above

Dante Virtual Soundcard allows you to:

  • Use a computer as an audio source or a destination on the network
  • Record multitrack audio directly to your computer
  • Record audio from multiple Dante equipped devices at one time
  • Send audio to multiple Dante equipped devices at one time
  • Record online conference audio (e.g. Skype)

Dante Virtual Soundcard is bundled with several popular Dante-enabled interfaces, thus providing a simple, complete and cost-effective recording solution. Since you are on a network you are no longer restricted by limited cable lengths. A Cat5E cable can be 100 Meters (110 Yards) between switch hops.

While AES67 does not provide performance improvements beyond what Dante already delivers today, the inclusion of AES67 in the Dante solution enables interoperability with other AES67 implementations by other compliant vendors.

Today, Dante provides interoperable audio networking between hundreds of products developed by our licensees. Dante already implements an IP Layer 3 transport, but AES67 will provide an alternative open standard within Dante for transport using the Real-time Transport Protocol (RTP) developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF).

To achieve interoperability, AES67 mandates a specific RTP payload format for delivering audio over IP networks, as well as methods for exchanging information about audio streams. RTP is already used extensively in communication and entertainment systems that involve streaming media, such as VoIP telephony, video conferencing, and IP television.  AES67 offers the potential for lower cost network transport built on mature standards when compared to other less widely adopted industry standards.

AES67 can exploit Ethernet switches supporting the IEEE-1588 precision time protocol and Quality of Service (QoS) but, unlike some other network standards, does not depend on specialized switches in order to operate.

Like Dante’s transport layer today, AES67 is by nature a routable IP protocol.  This allows for audio over IP solutions to scale beyond simple local area networks, passing through routers as well as switches.  This potentially opens broad new markets for audio over IP solutions.

Dante is a powerful technology that allows many channels of audio to be transmitted and received over a single Ethernet cable without the complexities and limitations of earlier solutions. Dante’s low latency and tight play-out synchronization meets the most demanding of professional audio and installed sound requirements using off-the-shelf IT equipment. It is easy to set-up configure and manage because Dante-enabled devices discover one another over the network and learn each other’s capabilities (number of input and output channels, sample rates and bit depths supported etc.) Dante devices and channels can be given “friendly” names meaning audio can be routed without having to use or remember magic numbers.

  • Processor: Dual core CPU
  • Memory: 1 Gigabyte of RAM
  • Network interface: Standard wired Ethernet, 100Mbps or higher. A Gigabit (1000Mbps) interface is necessary for use with channel counts above 32x32 @48kHz.
  • Storage/Disk: Disk speeds of at least 7200rpm are strongly recommended when recording 16 or more channels of audio.
  • Wireless LAN (Wi-Fi) interfaces are not supported.

More info

One of the most effective methods of improving overall I/O for media applications is to direct your recorded data to a fast hard drive that is not handling operating system chores - in other words, don't record on the same physical drive that is used to boot the computer. A separate data drive, either internal or external, is recommended.

The Dante MY16-AUD supports clocking from the on-board VCXO or can use the clock from Yamaha equipment. The latter choice may be useful when connecting several non-Dante devices to the Yamaha equipment that require a single word clock.

The Dante Controller provides two options that relate to clocking in the MY16-AUD. To see these, click the Clock Status tab in Dante Controller. This reveals a table of connected Dante devices with clock options.

Preferred Master - when selected, means that during a Clock election event, these devices will be given priority over other Dante devices on the network. In most cases you do not need to choose a Preferred Master.

Enabled Sync to External must be selected for any device that is being driven by another non-Dante clock; for example, if you choose to use the internal clock of a Yamaha device to sync a Dante MY16-AUD, this box should be checked for that device.

Note:  If a MY16-AUD derives its word clock from the Yamaha device, it is automatically made a “Preferred Master”

Note:  Incorrect selection of “Slave to External Word Clock” can result in a loss of audio. Be sure to check this setting if you have such a problem. Changes made here may require up to 20 seconds to synchronize.

If a piece of audio equipment is Dante-enabled, this means that it is capable of transmitting and/or receiving audio channels to/from other Dante-enabled equipment over a standard local area network running Internet Protocols (TCP/IP, UDP/IP etc).

In addition to audio routing the Dante Controller allows you to:

  • Configure device parameters such as device name, receive latency and sample rate and clocking parameters.
  • View network and device information such as link speeds, status and utilization; clock status and firmware version.
  • Be notified when significant changes happen on the network such as a change of clock master.

For more information, see the Dante Controller User Guide.

Dante makes use of standard Voice over IP (VoIP) Quality of Service (QoS) switch features, to prioritize clock sync and audio traffic over other network traffic. VoIP QoS features are available in a variety of inexpensive and enterprise Ethernet switches. Any switches with the following features should be appropriate for use with Dante:

  • Gigabit ports for inter-switch connections
  • Quality of Service (QoS) with 4 queues
  • Diffserv (DSCP) QoS, with strict priority
  • A managed switch is also recommended, to provide detailed information about the operation of each network link: port speed, error counters, bandwidth used, etc.
  • The ability to deactivate Energy Efficient Ethernet (EEE). Unmanaged switches that feature EEE should not be used with Dante.

Audio will continue to flow and a backup master clock will take over. If the master clock fails for any reason, a new master clock will be chosen from the existing slaves within a few seconds. The transition from one clock master to the other does not result in any loss of audio. The slave devices free run during the period of master clock transition.

If you try to give two Dante devices the same name, a conflict will be detected and one of the devices will be automatically renamed in order to preserve unique names. For example, if you call two Dante devices “Fred”, one of them will retain the name “Fred” and the other will rename itself as “Fred(2)”.

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Dante Controller is software created by Audinate that allows you to control, route and monitor Dante devices on a local area network. It is supported on both Windows and Mac OS X computers, providing robust performance and a simple, intuitive interface.

 

(Windows only)

Dante Discovery is an Audinate service that Dante software uses on Windows platforms to discover Dante-enabled devices on the network. It is installed automatically with newer Dante software applications, and for those applications it takes over the role of the previously used discovery service, Apple Bonjour.

The service needs to be running for Dante software to work. If the service stops, you can restart it via Task Manager > Services tab > Services button (bottom right).

If the service stops regularly:

  1. Uninstall Dante Controller.
  2. Uninstall Dante Discovery.
  3. Re-install Dante Controller.

Note:  Other Dante software applications (such as DVS) rely on Dante Discovery, and will not function while the service is uninstalled.

Note:  Do not uninstall Apple Bonjour - it is still required by older Audinate applications.

Note:  On OS X, the Apple Bonjour service is installed as part of the OS X operating system.

Dante Via’s network transmit latency is 10 milliseconds. Auxiliary signal paths (such as USB connections to and from soundcards) will add further latency.

Dante Virtual Soundcard is software that allows computers to act as Dante-enabled devices on a network. With Dante Virtual Soundcard, audio applications on your computers to send and receive up to 64 channels of uncompressed audio to and from other Dante-enabled devices, including other computers running Dante Virtual Soundcard. Dante Virtual Soundcard eliminates the need for expensive hardware soundcards.

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Dante is a complete media networking solution, and the de facto global standard for digital media networking.

Dante distributes uncompressed, multi-channel digital media via standard Ethernet networks, with near-zero latency and perfect synchronization.

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Latency is the time taken for a signal to travel from the input to the output of a system. All digital systems exhibit latency, with the primary contributors being (in order of signal flow) Analogue to Digital conversion, Digital-to-Digital conversion, Digital transport, Digital-to-Digital conversion, Digital to Analogue conversion.

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Windows only

In order to reserve processor resources for time-sensitive multimedia applications (including Windows audio applications), Windows implements a network bandwidth control called 'network throttling', which restricts the processing of non-multimedia network traffic when audio applications are running.

Network throttling can interfere with Dante Virtual Soundcard audio traffic when Windows audio applications are running. For this reason, you can let Dante Virtual Soundcard manage the network throttling setting on your PC, to prevent it from interfering with your Dante audio.

If network throttling is configured on your PC, Dante Virtual Soundcard will detect it when it is run or installed, and ask you if you would like Dante Virtual Soundcard to manage network throttling for you. Changing the setting will require a restart of your PC.

For more information, see this Microsoft knowledgebase article.

Quality of Service (QoS) is a feature of managed switches, which ensures that certain types of network packets (e.g. clock sync and audio packets) get preferential treatment and are "moved to the front of the line" ahead of other traffic. This is achieved by attaching a priority number to each packet, which is then used by the switches to ensure that high priority packets get processed before lower priority packets.

The AES67 standard provides interoperability recommendations for professional quality audio networking in the areas of synchronization, media clock identification, network transport, encoding, streaming and session description.  The Audio Engineering Society published the AES67 standard in September 2013.  You can obtain a copy of the standard here.

These numbers indicate the maximum rate that a port on a switch can transfer data. 100Mbps is often referred to as “Fast Ethernet”, 1000Mbps as “Gigabit Ethernet” and 10000Mbps as “10Ge” or 10 Gigabit Ethernet.

The number of channels that can traverse one link in a network is proportional to the link speed. A link will always slow down to the lowest speed connector on that link; for example if a Gigabit port on switch A is connected to a Fast Ethernet port on switch B, the link speed will be 100Mbps Fast Ethernet. This is good, because it allows you to mix link speeds in a network without having to do anything complicated.

Naturally the faster the links in your network, the higher the performance, and for this reason we recommend that you use gigabit Ethernet as much as possible, especially when switches are being linked together. Many Dante enabled devices use Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, for this reason it is a good idea to use gigabit switches throughout your Dante network.

The Dante Virtual Soundcard can be set for latency values of 4, 6 or 10ms. Lower settings require greater resources from the host computer, and so should be used only with machines that exceed the minimum requirements.

More info

While Gigabit switches are recommended, 100Mbps switches may be used in limited scenarios.

  • For low channel count (<32) applications, a 100Mbps switch may be used as long as it supports proper QoS, and QoS is active. The use of 100Mbps switches without QoS is not recommended or supported.
  • For higher channel counts, Gigabit switches are essential. QoS is recommended for Gigabit switches on networks that share data with services other than Dante.

The Dante MY16-AUD supports 48kHz and 96kHz sample rates. To set this, open Dante Controller and double click the name of the MY16-AUD you wish to adjust. A Device View will open. Click the Device Config tab and select the sample rate you wish to use from the drop-down menu. Confirm this choice in the dialog box that appears and the sample rate will be changed.

Note:  Only Dante devices running at the same sample rate may transport audio between one another.

Note:  If the MY16-AUD derives its word clock from the Yamaha product, make sure that this clock rate matches the setting made in Dante Controller.

That depends on the audio format that your are using. Please see the user guide for more information.

As most Dante devices support gigabit Ethernet, CAT5E or CAT6 cable is recommended. For purely 100Mbps networks, CAT5 may be used.

 

Testing under heavy load conditions has indicated that an Ultimo-based clock master can support at least 40 clock slave devices before synchronization issues may begin to manifest. Thus, dedicated Ultimo-only networks of up to ~40 devices should operate well under most load conditions.

A range of other network conditions may however affect the performance of the network, such as high multicast traffic, and the presence of non-Dante network traffic. As a rule of thumb, multicast bandwidth should be kept at less than 70% of the maximum supported bandwidth of the slowest link(s) in the network. For Ultimo networks (Ultimo devices have 100 Mbps network interfaces) this means multicast bandwidth should not exceed 70 Mbps. You can check your multicast bandwidth utilisation in Dante Controller.

QoS can be configured on your switches to prioritise PTP clock packets over audio packets. The use of QoS will increase the number of devices that can be supported on an Ultimo-only network (see this FAQ for more information about using QoS for Dante networks).

Also, the inclusion in your network of a Brooklyn II, Broadway, Dante HC, Dante PCIe or Dante-MY16-AUD/2 device to act as clock master will significantly increase the number of devices that can be supported in the network.

QoS is required when using Dante in networks that have 100Mbps devices and is optional in networks with Gigabit devices. We recommend that QoS be enabled in all Dante networks in order to ensure proper operation under all possible conditions.

See this FAQ for information about DSCP/Diffserv values.

 

When a particular audio channel or group of audio channels is being sent to multiple receivers (typically three or more) then it is a more efficient use of available network bandwidth to send a single multicast packet to many receivers than to send individual packets with identical payloads to each receiver.

More info

This error can occur when running older versions of Dante Virtual Soundcard on a Mac OS X system that is booted into 64-bit kernel mode. Reinstalling Dante Virtual Soundcard using the latest version will resolve the problem.

Failing that, you can boot the Mac in 32-bit kernel mode.

To force the machine to boot into 32-bit mode, hold the '3' and '2' keys while booting the machine. Conversely, holding the '6' and '4' keys will cause the machine to boot into 64-bit mode.

Note: Make sure you are running the lastest version of Dante Virtual Soundcard.

Windows: any audio application that supports WDM or the ASIO interface. This includes nearly all currently available professional level audio workstations such as Nuendo, Cubase, Reaper, and Pro Tools, and many consumer-level audio applications such as iTunes and Skype.

OS X: any audio application that supports the Core Audio interface. This includes all professional level audio workstations such as Logic and Cubase, as well as all consumer level applications such as iTunes and Garage Band.

More info

There are several issues that may result in Dante Controller not displaying complete information.

Firewall issues: Try disabling or adjusting any third party firewall software. Built-in firewalls by Microsoft and Apple should not be a problem.

ConMon failure: Occasionally the Dante Connection and Monitoring service (ConMon) will stop responding, resulting in empty areas of Dante Controller.

To fix, first make certain you are logged in as a local administrator and then:

Windows

  1. Open Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Services.
  2. Locate the Dante Control and Monitoring service (ConMon).
  3. Restart this service.
  4. Restart Dante Controller.

Mac OSX

  1. Open Applications > Utilities > Activity Monitor.
  2. Show “All Processes”.
  3. Search for “conmon”.
  4. When conmon_cmm is found, click Quit > Force Quit.
  5. Restart Dante Controller.

Multiple NICs: On some machines (notably Windows XP) the presence of multiple network cards (NICs) will confuse Dante Controller. Disable all but the NIC that is connected to the Dante network.

Bad network setup: Make sure that all of your Dante devices and computers are on the same network segment (subnet). The easiest way to do this is to use DHCP (automatic addressing); check to make sure that you don’t have incorrect static IP addresses that may be out of subnet range.

Yes. The purpose of the AES67 standard is to tie several existing protocols together to create an interoperability specification.  The goal of AES67 is that every audio device can eventually connect together with a standard IT network, and share audio. 

No. The latency settings for Dante Virtual Soundcard can be set at different parameters than the rest of your network and will not affect the playout to other devices. For example, the rest of the network could be set at 1ms latency for live audio while Dante Virtual Soundcard remains set for a higher value for recording.

More info

Support for AES67 will be rolled out progressively, starting with our highest volume shipping modules. An upgrade option will be offered to our OEMs, and they will determine if and when AES67 will be incorporated into their products. We anticipate this will begin in about 12 months. 

No. To ensure that this is always the case, switches in your network should have QoS enabled using common VoIP settings.

 

Some Windows 10 users may have encountered an issue that prevents the changing of the sample rate for Dante Virtual Soundcard in WDM mode.

This issue is under investigation and hopefully will be resolved in a future Dante Virtual Soundcard update.

Symptoms

On Windows 10, to change the sample rate for Dante Virtual Soundcard, you must first change it in Dante Controller, and then change it for each DVS device in the Windows Playback and Recording device settings.

This is typically done by right-clicking the speaker icon in the system tray and selecting ‘Playback devices’ (or ‘Recording devices’), double-clicking the DVS devices, and changing the sample rate in the ‘Advanced’ tab for each device.

However, depending on the version of Windows 10 you have, one of the following conditions may be observed:

  • The Advanced tab of the device properties panel is not visible, which prevents the changing of the sample rate for Dante Virtual Soundcard in Windows.
  • The Advanced tab is visible, but Dante Virtual Soundcard cannot play or receive audio when the sample rate has been changed.

Workaround

The workaround involves uninstalling Dante Virtual Soundcard and reinstalling it, then setting the required sample rate in ASIO mode BEFORE it is started.

  1. Uninstall Dante Virtual Soundcard.
  2. Reinstall Dante Virtual Soundcard.
  3. Open the Dante Virtual Soundcard control panel.
  4. Dante Virtual Soundcard will be currently unlicensed, and therefore not running. Do NOT license Dante Virtual Soundcard yet.
  5. Click the ‘Settings’ tab in the Dante Virtual Soundcard control panel and change the Audio Interface to ASIO.
  6. Go back to the ‘Licensing’ tab, and license Dante Virtual Soundcard using your existing license ID. It will start automatically in ASIO mode.
  7. In Dante Controller, open the Dante Virtual Soundcard device (double-click the device or hit CTRL+D) and select the ‘Device Config’ tab.
  8. Change the sample rate to the desired rate.
  9. Wait a second or two.
  10. Go back to the Dante Virtual Soundcard control panel and stop Dante Virtual Soundcard.
  11. Select WDM mode.
  12. Start Dante Virtual Soundcard.

Dante Virtual Soundcard should now be operating at the new sample rate. 

We recommend that you avoid using multiple user accounts when using Dante Via on Windows 7.

No - if you do, you will have to reinstall Dante Via. Just click No, then restart Dante Via using the button in the main UI or in the general preferences.

The current release of Dante Via for Windows does not support ASIO hardware interfaces. You cannot use Dante Via with Dante PCIe cards. Most other soundcards however support WDM, so you will be able to use those.

Dante Via does support ASIO software interfaces (e.g. from Dante Via to Nuendo).

The Windows device volume control for Dante Via may be turned down or muted.

To adjust the device volume in Windows:

  1. Left-click the speaker icon in your system tray.
  2. Select ‘Mixer’.
  3. Adjust or un-mute the Dante Via volume.

iTunes may be in 'Windows Audio Session' playback mode. For compatibility with Dante Via, iTunes must be set to 'Direct Sound' playback mode.

To change the iTunes playback mode to Direct Sound: 

  1. Open the iTunes Preferences.
  2. Click the Playback tab.
  3. Change the selection for 'Play Audio Using' to 'Direct Sound', and click OK.

Then:

  1. Close iTunes.
  2. Stop and close Dante Via.
  3. Open and start Dante Via.
  4. Open iTunes, and play some audio.

iTunes should now appear in your Sources list, and audio should flow correctly.

In Windows, software applications will not appear in the Local Applications areas until they are either actively playing audio (sources), or actively recording or receiving audio (destinations).

Some applications may also need to be configured to use Dante Via as the default input and/or output in order for them to appear in the Dante Via UI.

It is recommended that you start applications after Dante Via is already running. If when you start Dante Via, a running application isn't visible in the Dante Via UI, quit the audio application and restart it. You may also have to play or record audio using the application before it appears in Dante Via.